UK Election - "Oh bother" edition.

Discussion in 'Films, TV, Music, Books, Etc.' started by Grey, May 7, 2010.

  1. Grey

    Grey Rookie

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    The UK General Election results (with the exception of one constituency as a candidate recently passed away, so their vote will be postponed until the 27th) are in. We have a Hung Parliament, which will prolong the political dithering.

    Yet this is still one of the most entertaining General Elections the UK has seen in the last few decades. Highlights are as follows;

    • Jacqui Smith loses her seat. Now she'll have to pay for her husband's pornography herself rather than using tax payer money.
    • Charles Clark loses his seat. He does not take this news too well when asked for an interview shortly after the given result.
    • Lembit Opik loses his seat, nobody could have possibly seen this coming. His appearance on Have I Got News For You has him taking it in good humour with some hilarious retorts to a variety of jibes such as, "I'm not a politician!" and whipping out a harmonica for some impromptu busking.
    • British National Party leader Nick Griffin suffering titanic losses and a wonderful lack of support. All this empowered by the BNP clearly tearing itself apart at the seams, and even more BNP candidates tarnishing their reputation as a result of engaging in street fights with a group of Asians. (Unfortunately the BNP candidate in this situation was an ex-Royal Marine and sadly gave one of the Asian boys a thorough kicking, hopefully he will suffer at the hands of the law).
    • Esther Rantzen's plans of standing as an Independent MP are left in ruins, with a hilarious lack of support. She received less votes than the BNP in her constituency.
    • Brighton goes Green!
    • UK Independence Party takes a literal nose dive.
    • Jesus Christ himself challenges Conservative leader David Cameron in his own constituency.

    [​IMG]

    On the other hand, a complaint to be made. Several polling stations across the country turned voters away due to either being understaffed, and so could not cope with the mass turnout (voters qued for up to three hours in some constituencies and were turned away at 22:00) or in some cases, running out of ballot papers before polling was closed. This is utterly ludicrous as each polling station has a complete list of all registered voters for its respective constituency, and as such it would only take a second to work out the number of ballot papers needed for the polling station. In addition a patronizing congratulations to Preston, who managed to allow a fourteen year old boy to vote.
     
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  2. blobbohen

    blobbohen Rookie

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    I was glad to see that the Conservative party didn't get the seat count many would have thought they were going to receive. What's definitely a shame though was Nick Clegg not getting the necessary turnout to get his party better represented, though at the very least I'd say the guy made a strong case in breaking down some of the bipartisan set-up that's going on in England. I'd hope to see that duality-breaking transfer over here to the U.S. someday. In any case the BNP has eerie similarities to the Tea Party here so anything happening to their detriment causes me joy.

    I've been curious as to how this election was going to turn out so it will be very interesting to see how the next two weeks play through with how the parties will try to make coalition appeals to the Liberal Democrats in order to meet make that last gain for power.

    How did you end up voting, Grey? Were there voting issues in your part of the UK? We just had the primaries here in Ohio and the exact opposite problem in terms of voting participation. That's how it usually goes with primaries, though.
     
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  3. Grey

    Grey Rookie

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    Actually they were quite close to the mark many Conservative supporters thought they would hit. They really aren't that far off a majority and could actually form a minority government by forming a coalition with the Ulster Unionists, and completley negate the need for a Con/Lib coalition.

    1) United Kingdom, not England. 2) This sadly, turned out to just be media hype. The Lib Dems have actually lost several seats, some which nobody was expecting. While they made their presence well known, it was too little too late. Also, they got fucked by tactical voting, which is more reason to have electoral reform.

    BNP are essentially a one policy party of, "Darkies out!". If you pay attention to Nick Griffin's appearances in the media he has come very close to saying, "Aryan" when asked to define people who are, "Indigenous British People" and explaining he's actually ok with certain immigrants entering the country. The BNP have tried to appear as a more serious party by dressing their manifesto with more policies, unfortunately they're paper thin policies and everyone (with sense) knows it. Seeing the BNP clusterfuck fall apart today was fantastic.

    Next three days! By Monday we should hopefully have a more clear image of where we're heading. Although, I doubt there'll be a Con/Lib or Lab/Lib coalition without Lib Dems causing outrage from their supporters, or even having to throw many of their more important policies out of the window.

    Conservative. Remember in the UK we vote for our local MP, never the leader of the party. My area was one of many that came under last minute boundary changes in the naive hopes that Labour could cling on to seats. Didn't work, practically the entire region went Conservative. The Labour candidate here has a solid reputation for being a colossal blundering fool. Conservative candidate, stand up guy, actually sticks to his word and has been an MP here (bi-election two years ago) for two years, and has turned the place around quite well. Its very different (for the better) than it was a few years ago. The Lib Dem candidate... general consensus is that he should really be in the Monster Raving Loony Party.

    If the Greens had a bigger presence here I may have voted for them, but it really depends on the candidate... also my own interests, Conservatives serve me best.
     
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  4. Eyebrowsbv31

    Eyebrowsbv31 Rookie

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    I'm probably the only American that followed this election, and I got most of my information from have I got news for you. Calamity Clegg, eh?
     
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  5. malakian

    malakian Rookie

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    ^Well the ball's in his court now!

    DAVID DIMBELBY FOR PRIME MINISTER.
     
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  6. Grey

    Grey Rookie

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    Nope. Conservatives could very easily form a coalition with the DUP and have a minority government. All this courting for the LibDems is a way of trying to appease the Lib Dem voters and try to swing a few more over to Con/Lab. Nick Clegg is not the king maker he's being made out to be.
     
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  7. malakian

    malakian Rookie

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    Yes he is - the conservatives would need an alliance with 5 parties (which, of course, would be a too grueling and arduous deal to strike) to push past the 326 threshhold, and if the lib dems dont secure a deal with the conservatives then they will with labour. The Lib Dems are in a uniquely powerful position to implement their manifesto policies into the aims of either big party, so wont just give up on any alliance if the tories wont give ground - senior lib dems have been quoted as urging clegg to start talks with labour even now. At which point, a lib/labour coalition would have 315 seats effectively, and any minority conservative government would be destabilised by the fact it wouldnt be able to quickly pass legislation. Baring in mind that stability is the tory #1 priority, I wouldn't doubt for a second clegg is the king maker. Or, at least, king-feller.
     
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  8. Grey

    Grey Rookie

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    Blind? Read back. 326 is not the magic number their ideally after (barmy, yes, but that's them) Conservatives could ally with DUP and form a minority government as I posted just above you. If Labour can't get their act together, and considering they've quite literally told two parties (who would be key in a coalition Lab/Lib government) to piss off it doesn't look like they will get their act together, the Queen will invite David Cameron to attempt to form a government, which he could do with the DUP.

    Except in order for the Lib Dems to join either party they need to have all their MPs vote in favour of such action. Almost half of the Lib Dems are against siding with Labour (the half against Conservative) on principle alone. Both Labour and Conservatives have outline stark differences to the Lib Dems on several major policies with a frank refusal to negotiate on those points. Clegg, in fact the entire party would lose an enormous amount of support from the public should they relent on those issues just to (sort of) get into number 10. The, "angered exchanges" between Brown and Clegg are quite worrying too, although I'm not sure how credible that news story was as the beeb were unable to site a source, apart from their golden, "a source said". Yes, but what fucking source?

    Lib/Lab is looking less likely with each hour. The Con/Lib talks so far have been reported as, "constructive" from both parties, whereas Labour appear to be doing everything they possibly can to piss off everyone that could help them. You're ignoring the plain and simple fact that Clegg will have to relent on some (or even many depending on how the talks with either of the parties go) of the most of important Lib Dem policies in order to form a coalition government, that in no way is the material of a King Maker. That's the boy in the school yard you pick for your team when you realise you've just started to get to the weaker group and need to carefully manage which ones you pick and what position you give them.

    Don't talk about stability in government and try to make out Cleggers is the king maker at the same time. That's head explodey material.
     
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  9. malakian

    malakian Rookie

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    Your first point is addressed in my post so clearly you're the one not reading. Here it is again

    If Clegg doesn't ally, the conservatives will NOT be able to form a stable government with the DUP, so yes it's perfectly valid to talk about it at the same time. You really are totally ignoring everyone's motives in this. Why, when the DUP are traditionally a conservative party, is David Cameron insistant on negotiation with the lib dems? Because they will not be able to form a government that can push legislation through otherwise. Cameron keeps clarifying this himself by using the phrase 'we need a stable government'.

    Second point is wrong - lib dems confirmed earlier the talks were amicable. As for MPs voting, I dont know how the lib dem heirachy works but do you *HONESTLY* think they will not vote to get their agenda ahead? Why else would they be even considering an alliance with their complete antithesis? Nick Clegg's phrasing gives it all away: 'For the good of the country'. They will push their agenda either way and Labour recognise this which is why the olive branch was in Gordon's first speech out of number 10.

    Saying it's 'less likely' isnt my point - I'm confident they will strike a deal with the tories, but what I'm certain of is if they dont, they will strike a deal with labour. Labour will give any concession necessary at the moment, which is illustrated by Gordon's U-turn on voting reform in his speech offering talks.

    The ball is definitely in Clegg's court.
     
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  10. Grey

    Grey Rookie

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    Do you realise how incredibly foolish it would be to not even attempt to enter into talks with the Lib Dems? By entering a hung parliament with the prospect of another election in the coming months a very real possibility, all parties need to continue to try and win over voters and not make a total cock up of things at the first instance. This goes both ways, as the Lib Dems are bound by their word to enter into talks with the highest number of seats first in the event of a hung parliament, regardless of how strongly they oppose said party's policies may be, yet out of the two parties who they're more likely to form a coalition with (without being fucked), it would be Labour. The DUP's alliance with the Conservatives are practically set in stone, making such actions the ideal back up plan, whereas Labour on the other hand, as I mentioned, have managed to alienate several major players in a possible alliance. You talk of ignoring everyone's motives in this and yet do the same, how can Lib Dem possibly form a coalition with either party and come out of this without losing massive support and kissing goodbye to some of their key policies? Labour have to give them an utterly amazing deal, which they can do, but their actions over the last three days are making that seem more and more unlikely. Conservatives can only offer so much to the Lib Dems, and they can take that stance quite happily because as you and I both know, a) they're mad and b) they're mad enough to try for a minority government and go with it.

    Saying talks are anything other than amicable at the moment is potential suicide, given the delicate situation and that Labour talks are still due (should be happening now or quite soon). Any statement venturing outside the realms of, "the most vague response we can possibly give" can drastically change the terms of whatever deal Labour are planning to push. The same goes for the party voting to get their agenda ahead, it all depends on the outcome of whichever deal they take, if they even take one at all.

    The ball is very much still in Brown's court at the moment until such time that we, to put it so eloquently as Jeremy Vines did on Thursday, "Activate the Queen!"
     
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  11. Trippysmurf

    Trippysmurf Rookie

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    Gordon Brown stepping down in September? Oh Snap!
     
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  12. Grey

    Grey Rookie

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    Yep. Although if the Lib Dems agree on the deal the Conservatives have offered them (holy shit, they're actually offering electoral reform!) and go for it, Brown would be very hard pressed to stay as PM and keep Labour in power until September.

    I'll admit it Mala, Cleggers is now King-Maker...ish.
     
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  13. Longo_2_guns

    Longo_2_guns Forum Moderator
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    I saw British Parliament live once. What started as a simple bill about zoning laws quickly became a shouting match between two 50 year old men who would never even be affected by the bill. Then they both took metal canes and started whacking each other with them. If there were guns in England, all of the Politicians would have shot each other ages ago.
     
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  14. Grey

    Grey Rookie

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    David Cameron is our new Prime Minister.

    The Conservatives and Liberal Democrats successfully formed a coalition government.
     
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  15. kapow

    kapow Regular

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    jeez, i know people avatar, but this is just ridiculous!
     
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  16. Grey

    Grey Rookie

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    Not the first to make that joke I'm afraid.

    (Avatar is just Dances With Wolves in space. There, I said it.)
     
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  17. Longo_2_guns

    Longo_2_guns Forum Moderator
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    You aren't the first person to say that either.
     
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  18. Grey

    Grey Rookie

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    Good. Its over rated tripe. :)
     
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  19. monkeygoat

    monkeygoat Rookie

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    I agree with Grey.

    Anyway, who's for bets on when the con-lib love affair will disintegrate?
     
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  20. malakian

    malakian Rookie

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    I'm really worried the tories will overturn the human rights act 1998, so i'm hoping it doesnt disintegrate..
     
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