That Knowing Smile

Discussion in 'Films, TV, Music, Books, Etc.' started by Yokiro, May 6, 2010.

  1. Yokiro

    Yokiro Regular

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    Just wanted to point those interested in the direction of this blog post by the sometimes maligned, especially by upset gamers, Roger Ebert: http://blogs.suntimes.com/ebert/2010/04/the_golden_age_of_movie_critic.html

    That which is of interest, beyond the article itself for those interested in the man's profession, can be found easily if you simply search for the first smile on the page, a likely familiar combination of a colon and parentheses. Why this is of interest to gamers, as you may find overt if the smile is located, is an acknowledgment of a controversial statement he made that has been complained, whined, and most certainly bitched about all over the internet, including this site. This single smile, along with this single line, can mean so much more than their size might suggest. It is, upfront, the acknowledgment of the sure quality that can be found in criticism of video games, the kind that includes the recent quality review for Alan Wake that has its own minor discussion of writing within it. From that, he also allows the possibility that he was incorrect, and the fact that his statement may have been far more malleable than any complaint about it would have one believe.

    This article, in the end, is about the old world accepting and joining the new, and with that sentence standing out on its own, with that knowing smile standing out even further, it would seem that a criticized critic talking about criticism can be finally cut some more slack than antecedently considered achievable by the critical. Even beyond this possible change of heart, or at least allowance, the man should be given far more positive credit than he may have received, as anything to help get those enamored with games to make an assessment of their true love's truth and expand its validity through higher levels of thought, that go beyond the amorous ones, can't be as terrible and painful a thing as possibly perceived previously.
     
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  2. Chris_Crime

    Chris_Crime Rookie

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    I'll reserve judgment on Alan Wake and Heavy Rain until I've played them, then look back to Roger Ebert for helping spur the video games as art cottage industry, perhaps thank him.
    What better critic to help commercialize a niche market? More help than hurt.

    Yokiro Best New Poster Award 2010

    Yokiro Best New Poster Award 2011
     
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  3. Yokiro

    Yokiro Regular

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    Art requires both conflict and support in order to exist, the internal or external struggle being fought and the patron allowing the works to be bought. So far, there's been a multitude of both over the short history of video games and the progression and maturing is simply interesting in its complexities and I was only commenting upon one minor facet.

    I’m mostly concerned with the backlash Ebert received for his comments, because when a man like Hideo Kojima doesn't feel as though video games are art per-say (http://kotaku.com/150043/kojima-says-games-are-not-art) and says so without getting much in the way of inflammatory responses, it seems to boil down to the perceived credibility of the person commenting. Roger Ebert's remarks were somehow immediately made erroneous because, unlike Kojima, Ebert is in a different chosen field of focus than the one he commented on, and even though Kojima has made some strange choices, Ebert’s managed to cause him to lack credibility causing some to negate his comments completely. (http://www.gamerevolution.com/manifesto/view.php?id=110) Another flippant possibility is it’s because he's of a previous generation, and he’s not meant to understand . (http://www.penny-arcade.com/comic/2010/4/21/)

    My initial response to the view presented in the comic, as a point of contention to the point made alongside the statement that Ebert is simply meant to be critical of the young, would have to be, "Who declared them artists? Are they not more like artisans, who construct a thing that serves a purpose, is simply decorative, or the two combined, who are commonly not considered artists? It is men such as those that constructed the works planned and designed by men considered artists for their own vision, but who are never considered artists themselves. I'm sure it could be argued that the person in charge of a game’s development could be considered an artist, but it's such a work of group construction and input for the sake of the specific functions the game delivers that such individuals' artistry can be questioned. After all, something that may be considered the most interesting part of a game may be devised by someone not the recognized artist/artisan in charge, and it's not as if sections of a game are commonly considered art, nor are certain objects, no matter how well they were crafted.â€
     
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  4. Chris_Crime

    Chris_Crime Rookie

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    The ironic part is the game industry is still looking for a Hollywood acceptance to their art, as if it lacks some missing piece of credibility.. if anything, the biz should be considered sanctuary!
    It's very love-hate. This is the same spotlight we'll attack via Twitter accounts for ruining a gem like Spider-Man: Web of Shadows. How dare they shop it out to some noob dev team! (seriously)

    Meanwhile, gaming has never been more mainstream than it is today.
    Just like that stubborn old man, we want it both ways.

    So we do all that we've ever known to do, what we know is best, we support the industry. There is no good or bad, only the promise of a shinier, faster tomorrow.
    Our reward? Pleasure in seeing *our* game announced on SpikeTV's 4th annual video game award show because, finally, and for the 4th year in a row, they're validating *our* [developer]'s [game] for the [console/PC], and that means they're validating us.
    We deserve the criticism, though we've no time for the criticism. macro>image>post :notimeforcriticism: Who's cool now asshole

    Roger Ebert has his points. You have to wonder what his intentions were. Maybe he sees the similarities between Hollywood and the gaming industry? That line is getting a little blurry. There's a Lots of sequels on both sides. Even Hollywood looks to us now, the young guys are finally getting their shot.
    But for all of our artistic know-how and off the wall net savvy, what have we really offered outside of our Zombie, Guns and Comic Book comfort zone? They were doing the same thing on 1920s radio!

    Roger Ebert is laughing, Laughing from his GRAVE! So yeah fresh ideas need not apply.

    I'm off to turn in some Playstation points and buy my avatar some new threads. ART

    edit:
    http://kotaku.com/5533212/this-man-woul ... video-game
    art imitating art
     
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